Issue:  Vol. 47 / No. 42 / 19 October 2017
 

Proposed porn regulations defeated

A scene from Liam Cole's Overload. Photo: via Treasure Island Media.

A scene from Liam Cole’s Overload. Photo: via Treasure Island Media.

A proposal that would have required condoms, dental dams, eye protection, and other barriers in porn movies was defeated today (Thursday, February 18) at a California Department of Industrial Relations’ Division of Occupational Safety and Health board meeting in Oakland.

At today’s hearing before the agency’s standards board, almost 100 performers, along with producers, doctors, and others spoke against the regulations, according to the Free Speech Coalition.

Eric Paul Leue, the porn group’s executive director, said in a news release, “These regulations were based in stigma rather than science, and would have severely hurt adult performers. This shows what can happen when producers and performers unite. We look forward to working with Cal/OSHA on sensible regulation that respects performers’ choices.”

However, Leue added, “a larger battle” remains.

The Los Angeles-based AIDS Healthcare Foundations is backing a state ballot initiative that would “replicate and amplify the worst parts of the regulations” that failed today, he said. Additionally, AHF’s proposal would allow private citizens to sue porn actors for not using condoms in films.

“This idea – that private citizens can sue adult performers because of actions they disapprove of is outrageous, and would not be permitted in any other sector of our society,” Leue said.  “We will fight this, and this too, we will win.”

An AHF spokesman didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

In an email to the Bay Area Reporter, staff at Cal/OSHA said, “While the standards board voted against adopting the proposed regulation, condoms are still required under the existing bloodborne pathogens standard in California and nationwide. This includes adult films.”

The agency “will continue to enforce existing regulations and investigate complaints in the adult film industry, as it has since 2004.”

 

 

— Seth Hemmelgarn, February 18, 2016 @ 6:12 pm PST
Filed under: Uncategorized


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