Issue:  Vol. 47 / No. 49 / 7 December 2017
 

Traffic stop data collection rules finalized; includes LGBT info

Attorney General Xavier Becerra

Attorney General Xavier Becerra

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra announced Wednesday that the regulations drafted by the state Department of Justice for collecting law enforcement stop data have been finalized.

With the regulations, which are part of Assembly Bill 953, the Racial and Identity Profiling Act of 2015, officers will have to track their perception of each person’s race, gender, and whether they perceive that person as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender, among other provisions.

The nine largest agencies will begin collecting the stop data July 1, 2018 and report it to the DOJ.

“Public safety is a job for all of us – our peace officers, of course, but a cooperative citizenry as well,” Becerra said in a news release. “Trust is the glue that makes the relationship between law enforcement and the community work. This new RIPA data collection and reporting process is meant to strengthen, and in some cases repair, that trust.”

Along with perceived orientation and gender identity, officers will also be required to collect information on the reason for and result of the stop.

Chief Edward Medrano, Co-Chair of the RIPA Advisory Board and President of the California Police Chiefs Association, stated that the association “has routinely proven to be a collaborative partner with various stakeholders throughout California in our efforts to increase public safety and enhance community trust in law enforcement. The Racial and Identity Profiling Act and the recently approved regulations is another tool to ensure our officers continue to provide fair and impartial policing to the communities we serve.”

Assemblywoman Shirley Weber, who authored AB 953, said, “With these regulations we will have the comprehensive hard data necessary to understand the scope of the problem and to make practical decisions about how to reduce over-policing persons of color, a practice that wastes resources, engenders mistrust and compromises public safety.”

More information is available at www.oag.ca.gov/ab953/regulations.

— Seth Hemmelgarn, November 15, 2017 @ 5:20 pm PST
Filed under: Uncategorized


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