Issue:  Vol. 46 / No. 29 / 21 July 2016
 

Wiener wants Kim to stop calling for ‘gimmicky, self-serving pledges’

Supervisors Jane Kim, left, and Scott Wiener at an April debate. Photo: Rick Gerharter

Supervisors Jane Kim, left, and Scott Wiener at an April debate. Photo: Rick Gerharter

Gay state Senate candidate Scott Wiener has called on his opponent, Jane Kim, to sign a “Pledge To Stop Demanding Gimmicky Self-Serving Pledges.”

In an open letter today (Thursday, July 7), Wiener, who serves with Kim on San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors and is running against her for the 11th District seat, refers to a recent request Kim made for Wiener to not “refer to her record or even say her name during the campaign.” Wednesday, she requested Wiener sign a pledge “to discourage outside negative attacks,” Wiener said in an email to supporters.

Wiener referred to Kim’s first pledge as the “Don’t say my name” pledge and said her messages are “anti-democratic and ill-advised attempts to censor the full and informed debate that voters deserve.”

He said her latest demand essentially asks him to “renounce his endorsement by the Democratic Party and by LGBT civil rights groups, by agreeing to pay a penalty if the Democratic Party or LGBT groups send out any voter communication listing their endorsement.”

Wiener also pointed to support Kim has received from PG&E and said as the company’s “favored candidate,” she’s “the beneficiary of a utility that is notorious for last-minute, lavish, and largely unaccountable expenditures to influence election outcomes.”

He then asks her to sign his pledge, which includes the promise to “refrain from feigned pretensions of shock, disappointment, offense, and other expressions of mock moral superiority because” her proposed pledges “are, in fact, political stunts and gimmicks unworthy of the voters.”

In an interview, Julie Edwards, who’s with Kim’s campaign, explained that Kim’s urging of Wiener to discourage outside help comes from U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren’s (D-Massachusetts) “People’s Pledge,” which Edwards said has been shown to reduce “the influence of outside spending in elections.”

“To call Elizabeth Warren’s People’s Pledge a gimmick is a remarkable statement,” Edwards said, and shows “how determined he is to run a negative campaign.”

 

— Seth Hemmelgarn, July 7, 2016 @ 1:13 pm PST
Filed under: Uncategorized


Gay man attacked at tent in SOMA

 

Division and Potrero streets. (Photo: Google)

Division and Potrero streets. (Photo: Google)

A gay man was attacked Monday at his tent in San Francisco’s South of Market neighborhood.

The July 4 attack started at about 1 a.m. at Division and Potrero streets after the victim confronted the suspect, “who was being noisy” outside the victim’s tent, Officer Carlos Manfredi, a police spokeswoman, said in a summary.

The suspect called the victim “a derogatory name” and then threw an unknown object at the victim, who’s 42 and “claimed to be homosexual.”

The victim suffered a cut to his right palm that required stitches and was taken to a hospital, Manfredi said.

The suspect was described as a black male ages 27 to 28. No arrests have been made. Police are investigating the incident as a hate crime.

The incident occurred in an area that’s been the site of numerous homeless tent encampments.

— Seth Hemmelgarn, July 6, 2016 @ 2:31 pm PST
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California has officially broken up with the terms “husband” and “wife”

California is divorcing itself from the terms “husband” and “wife” when it comes to the terminology found in its state codes.

Governor Jerry Brown announced this morning that he had signed into law Senate Bill 1005 by state Senator Hannah-Beth Jackson (D-Santa Barbara). The legislation changes the terms “husband” and “wife” to the gender-neutral term “spouse” in more than a dozen sections of California code.

California Governor Jerry Brown (Courtesy governor's office)

California Governor Jerry Brown (Courtesy governor’s office)

Brown signed the bill without comment. It the first of five LGBT-specific bills to be officially adopted this legislative session.

This past Sunday, June 26, marked the third anniversary since the U.S. Supreme Court allowed to stand a lower court ruling invalidating Proposition 8, the same-sex marriage ban voters adopted in 2008, leading the way for same-sex marriages to resume in California.

Sunday, which coincided with this year’s San Francisco Pride parade, also marked the one-year anniversary since the U.S. Supreme Court ruled all 50 states must allow same-sex couples to wed.

Due to Jackson’s bill the non-gender specific “spouses” found in California codes will also refer to registered domestic partners. The legislation followed on the heels of a number of code language clean up bills that gay state Senator Mark Leno (D-San Francisco) passed in previous years that also did away with gender-specific terminology favoring heterosexual couples.

Jackson introduced SB 1005 not only in response to same-sex couples being able to legally marry in the Golden State, but also in recognition of those couples, whether same-sex or opposite-sex, that have decided to remain in, or enter into, registered domestic partnerships.

“I’m very pleased this bill has now become law. By removing outdated language from the state code, the law will now accurately reflect the rights of same-sex couples in California and the fact that marriage equality is now the law of the land,” stated Jackson in a statement issued Tuesday, July 5. “This helps ensure the equal and fair treatment of all same-sex couples in California.”

Added Rick Zbur, executive director of the statewide LGBT advocacy group Equality California, “We are grateful to Senator Jackson and to Governor Brown for making sure all areas of the law reflect reality and respect married same-sex couples.”

— Matthew S. Bajko, July 1, 2016 @ 11:06 am PST
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Pentagon lifts ban on open trans service

Defense Secretary Ashton Carter on Thursday announced that the ban on open trans military service has been lifted. The decision comes amid the release of recommendations from a working group formed last year to study the issue.

(Defense Secretary Ashton Carter)

(Defense Secretary Ashton Carter)

The announcement includes recommendations, plans, and a timeline to when transgender service members will fully be able to serve openly and authentically.

Trans military groups hailed the June 30 announcement.

“OutServe-SLDN applauds and welcomes Secretary Carter’s announcement today,” Matt Thorn, executive director, said in a news release.

OutServe-SLDN said that every day, an estimated 15,500 trans service members are forced to live quietly and “serve in righteous indignation, anticipating the end of the discriminatory ban on open trans service to be lifted in the armed forces.”

Congress repealed “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” which prohibited open service by LGB people, in 2010. The ban was officially lifted in the fall of 2011.

The lifting of the ban on open trans service did not require congressional action. Carter has been studying the issue for months.

OutServe-SLDN also announced that it would expand its legal resources for transgender veterans who wish to update their DD214s with name changes and other record updating, in addition to its legal services aiding those who have been separated and wish to re-enter the military.

For more information, visit http://www.outserve-sldn.org/?.

— Cynthia Laird, June 30, 2016 @ 11:13 am PST
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Matt Dorsey, SF city attorney’s longtime gay spokesman, announces resignation

Matt Dorsey plans to leave the SF city attorney's office in September. Photo: Andrea Guzman

Matt Dorsey plans to leave the SF city attorney’s office in September. Photo: Andrea Guzman

Matt Dorsey, the longtime gay spokesman for San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera, has announced his resignation from the office. He plans to depart after Labor Day in order to assist with a smooth transition of the role.

After 14 years serving as Herrera’s main press representative, Dorsey has been hired by Lighthouse Public Affairs as a partner and will oversee the firm’s communications and media relations practice. The firm is the result of a merger last month between Barbary Coast Consulting and Goodyear, Peterson, Hayward and Associates.

While his decision is “bittersweet,” Dorsey told the Bay Area Reporter he couldn’t pass up the opportunity to work for Lighthouse and return to the private sector. He will be the firm’s 12th employee.

“This is an exciting time right now to be a communications professional. The media landscape is changing dramatically, but the market place of ideas is more vibrant than ever,” said Dorsey, who is also the departing secretary for the local Democratic Party after opting not to run again for a seat on the Democratic County Central Committee. “It is times like these where innovators get to re-write the rules. I can’t imagine a better place to do that than at a firm like Lighthouse.”

Lighthouse Partner Rich Peterson said Dorsey would focus on communication strategy and crisis communication for the firm’s clients, which include Cisco, Dolby, the San Francisco Giants, and AT&T. That side of the firm’s business, said Peterson, has lagged compared to its political strategy and lobbying work.

“We don’t know of anybody in the business more talented than Matt and more respected than Matt,” said Peterson. “The opportunity for him to join our firm is really exciting.”

Among the highlights of Dorsey’s time working for Herrera were the office’s nine-year legal battle to win marriage rights for same-sex couples, both at the state and federal level, as well as the court struggle to ensure City College of San Francisco did not shutter due to a fight over its accreditation.

“I think, personally, the marriage case was something that felt like having a front row seat to history,” said Dorsey, adding that, “it was extremely high profile and a lot of press work involved in it. And I am grateful to be a part of that.”

Herrera described Dorsey as a “tremendous asset” who will be sorely missed.

“In a lot of ways Matt is irreplaceable, not just for his talent and his commitment to the city, but for his personal integrity, his passion and his fun,” said Herrera. “I am going to miss him terribly but know he will do a great job in his next endeavor. We will do our very best to find somebody to step into his shoes.”

Re-elected to another four-year term last November, Herrera said Dorsey’s departure should not be seen as signaling what his own future plans will be. Already, some have speculated he may opt not to run again in 2019.

“The only thing people should read into it is Matt Dorsey wants to go make some money,” quipped Herrera.

— Matthew S. Bajko, June 27, 2016 @ 1:07 pm PST
Filed under: Uncategorized


Queer, trans groups in SF criticize proposal on homeless people’s tents

Photo: Dan Brekke/KQED

Photo: Dan Brekke/KQED

Queer and transgender community members are criticizing San Francisco Supervisor Mark Farrell’s proposal to stop homeless people from staying in tents on the city’s sidewalks.

Citing survey data that show almost 30 percent of the local homeless population identify as LGBT, longtime queer activist Tommi Avicolli Mecca and others said in a news release that Farrell’s initiative would “make it even more difficult for queer/trans and all homeless people to survive and get off the streets” and would “further criminalize homeless people who already face fines and jail time from anti-panhandling and sit/lie laws.”

The statement, signed by Coalition on Homelessness, Communities United Against Violence, El/La Para TransLatinas, and others, also said that the proposal “plays into the homeless bashing” favored by neighbors and merchants in the Castro, Haight, and other neighborhoods, “where scores of homeless queer/trans youth and adults have sought refuge.”

“There is no pride in homeless-bashing neighborhoods or ballot initiatives,” the groups said. “Already, police have begun sweeps of the homeless in the Castro in preparation for this weekend’s queer and transgender celebrations. Are not queer homeless youth who flee here from homophobic families and schools throughout the country members of our community?”

San Francisco Police Department spokespeople didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment on the “sweeps” allegation.

The queer and trans advocates’ news release also pointed to laws that were passed in the 1960s and 70s to restrict gay men’s access to parks and even stop them from walking or sitting “on the streets.”

“We call on the Board of Supervisors, members of the queer and transgender communities, and concerned people of San Francisco to speak out against this initiative and to join with us in saying that we will not allow homeless queer and transgender members of our community to be swept off the streets, banned from having a tent, fined or arrested for sitting or lying on a sidewalk or stopped from using any public space that every person in this city has a right to,” the groups said. “Our people need housing, not jail cells, house keys not handcuffs.”

Farrell’s proposal is supported by gay Supervisor Scott Wiener, along with Supervisors Katy Tang and Malia Cohen.

In his own news release Tuesday, when he submitted his “Housing Not Tents” initiative for the November ballot, Farrell said, “It is not compassionate to allow human beings to live in tents on our streets – it is both dangerous and unhealthy. The answer to homelessness is housing, not tents.”

The initiative would mandate that shelter or housing be offered to people who are living in an encampment before it’s removed.

A majority of voters have to support “Housing Not Tents” for the initiative to become law.

The city would have to provide 24 hours notice, in writing, of the intent to remove the encampment. Everyone staying in the encampment would need to be informed “of a specific available shelter or housing opportunity.”

The Department of Public Works would store each person’s property for up to 90 days.

Farrell anticipates that expected money for homeless housing, Navigation Centers, and homelessness programs will provide ample housing and shelter opportunities for his proposal to succeed.

 

— Seth Hemmelgarn, June 24, 2016 @ 4:51 pm PST
Filed under: Uncategorized


SF supe secures remaining $2.5 million for Getting to Zero

Supervisor Scott Wiener. Photo: Rick Gerharter

Supervisor Scott Wiener. Photo: Rick Gerharter

Gay San Francisco Supervisor Scott Wiener told the Bay Area Reporter today (Friday, June 24) that he’s secured another $2.5 million for the city’s Getting to Zero initiative, which aims to eliminate new HIV infections in the city.

Advocates had asked Mayor Ed Lee for $3.1 million to support the initiative, but Lee had included only $600,000 in the budget he proposed in June. The city’s fiscal year starts July 1.

In a text message to the B.A.R. today, Wiener said, “I was able to obtain the entire $2.5 million for Getting to Zero. In combination with the mayor’s $600,000, we fully funded the entire $3.1 million budget package. … We worked closely with the GTZ consortium” and HIV/AIDS Provider Network to ensure the money’s there, he said.

“We had to fight hard keep it intact,” Wiener said. Supervisor Mark Farrell, chair of the board’s Budget and Finance Committee, “absolutely had the LGBT community’s back in helping us move this forward.”

The city has a two-year budget cycle. The $3.1 million is for the first year.

In a news release, Wiener said, “The Getting to Zero Consortium and HAPN have been working diligently over the last year to develop key initiatives to sustain San Francisco’s momentum in its effort to become the first place to achieve the UNAIDS goals of zero new HIV transmissions, zero HIV deaths, and zero stigma. While we had formulated a very strong and innovative plan to attain those goals, the funding to implement the plan was lacking. We have now addressed that lack of funding through the city budget.”

The $600,000 that Lee proposed is meant to expand access to PrEP in underserved communities throughout San Francisco.

In 2014, Wiener became the first elected official to disclose publicly that he takes PrEP.

“We want to thank Supervisor Wiener for his leadership in obtaining this $2.5 million investment – an investment that will save lives,” stated Lance Toma, HAPN co-chair and member of the GTZ Consortium steering committee. “We are also grateful to Mayor Lee and Supervisor Farrell for their support. These funds are critical for strengthening our citywide response to ensure people newly diagnosed with HIV get on life-saving medications within 48 hours and addressing HIV-related stigma.”

Toma, who’s also executive director of San Francisco’s Asian and Pacific Islander Wellness Center, added, “Even more critical, we will be able to expand our core medical and support services infrastructure to retain and re-engage those with the highest needs in care and on HIV treatment.”

Brett Andrews, executive director of Positive Resource Center, which provides services including benefits counseling for people living with HIV, said, “Retaining and re-engaging people with HIV in care is essential to maintaining their health and preventing deaths from HIV, one of the three Getting to Zero goals. We salute the vision and foresight of the board, most notably Supervisors Wiener and Farrell, in ensuring adequate funds are available to support our historic work.  It can be very difficult at times to keep people with HIV in care. Many are confronted with a host of issues. In addition, keeping people in care saves the city money in the long run since typically patients off treatment spiral downward and often end up in the ER with full blown AIDS.”

— Seth Hemmelgarn, @ 3:26 pm PST
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Pride honorees withdraw from parade, festival

Two grand marshals and an honoree of this weekend’s San Francisco Pride parade have withdrawn from the event, citing increased police presence following the mass shooting at a gay Orlando nightclub.

Community grand marshal Janetta Johnson, organization grand marshal Black Lives Matter, and honoree St. James Infirmary announced their withdrawal Friday, June 24.

(SF Pride grand marshal Janetta Johnson has withdrawn from this weekend's Pride activities. Photo: Courtesy SF Pride)

(SF Pride grand marshal Janetta Johnson has withdrawn from this weekend’s Pride activities. Photo: Courtesy SF Pride)

“In light of the recent announcement that Pride participants would be subject to increased policing, metal detectors, and discretionary admittance, several grand marshals and awardees of the ‘racial and economic justice’ themed event are withdrawing from participation in the Pride parade or Civic Center activities because of the unsafe conditions created for our communities by law enforcement,” a news release stated.

“In the aftermath of the Orlando shooting that took the lives of dozens of queer, trans and gender non-conforming people of color, many people in our community are afraid,” the statement read. “For us, celebrating Pride this year meant choosing between the threat of homophobic vigilante violence and the threat of police violence. We had a tough decision to make, and ultimately we chose to keep our people safe by not participating in any event that would leave our communities vulnerable to either.”

SF Pride and city officials held a news conference Monday where they announced the security changes ahead of this weekend’s events, including metal detectors and bag checks for people entering the festival area at Civic Center Saturday, June 25 and Sunday, June 26.

The screenings are in response to the June 12 massacre at Pulse nightclub in Orlando in which 49 people were fatally shot and 53 were injured, SF Pride Executive Director George Ridgely said at the news conference with the mayor, police, and other city officials.

Johnson, executive director of the Transgender Gender Variant and Intersex Justice Project – an organization by and for trans, gender non-conforming and intersex people in prisons, jails, and detention centers – announced her decision to withdraw from the parade at the Pride media party Friday.

“While I am thankful for this honor, and grateful to Pride for bringing our work to the front this year, the decision to add more police to Pride does not make me, or my community, more safe,” Johnson said.

While honorees recognized the increased concerns about safety in light of the Orlando tragedy, several argued that a greater police presence would increase the likelihood of violence against queer and trans people of color.

“In the Bay Area, and the rest of the country, black communities experience real fear and terror at the hands of homophobic vigilantes and law enforcement, and we work every day to find solutions. We know the militarization of large-scale events only gives the illusion of safety. We are choosing to do the real work of building safe communities,” said Shanelle Matthews, a member of Black Lives Matter, who also announced their withdrawal from the parade.

The St. James Infirmary, which was slated to receive the Heritage of Pride Award at the main stage on Sunday, echoed the concerns of the grand marshals.

“LGBT sex workers are often victims of violence and exploitation at the hands of police,” said Executive Director Stephany Ashley. “The increased police presence at Civic Center, as well as the ban on shopping carts and items typically belonging to marginally housed and homeless people, will only make pride less safe and accessible to our communities. These policies do not reflect the theme of racial and economic justice which we sought to march under proudly.”

SF Pride officials did not immediately return an email seeking comment.

It is unclear what effect the new security measures will have on attendance this weekend.

Vick Germany, a self-identified butch dyke and co-president of Dykes on Bikes, said she has heard that some people will not be attending because of concerns about safety.

Dykes on Bikes, which is celebrating its 40th anniversary this year, will lead the Pride parade as usual.

– Sari Staver contributed to this report.

— Cynthia Laird, @ 2:01 pm PST
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Apothecarium moves forward with SF Castro, Marina pot dispensaries

An artist rendering shows the proposed interior for the Apothecarium's new Marina location.

An artist rendering shows the proposed interior for the Apothecarium’s new Marina location.

The Apothecarium is moving forward with its plans to open new medical marijuana dispensaries in San Francisco’s gay Castro district and Marina neighborhood later this year.

Despite vehement opposition to its proposed Lombard Street location from the Cow Hollow Association, the Apothecarium prevailed Wednesday night in beating back an appeal of its permit for the Marina location by the neighborhood group. The city’s Board of Appeals deadlocked 2-2 on the matter, meaning the permit appeal was denied.

The Apothecarium, which opened its first location near the intersection of Market and Church streets five years ago, won approval from the city’s planning commission last fall to open at 2414 Lombard Street. According to the dispensary, 2,650 of its patients live in the Marina area.

It expects to begin construction on the space within the next 60 to 90 days, depending on how fast city officials sign off on the needed permits, and is planning to open by the end of this year.

“It was a long, arduous process with formidable opposition, but we made some great friends in the neighborhood along the way,” stated Apothecarium co-owner Ryan Hudson. “We’re looking forward to opening in the Marina and serving the 2,700 patients that we already have in the northern part of town. We’d like to thank all of our friends, customers and supporters who turned out to tell their personal stories in support of our application.”

Construction is already underway at the Apothecarium’s new location on upper Market Street. In April it won approval from the planning commission to move into the shuttered Shanghai Restaurant space at 2029 Market Street.

Unlike with its Marina site, the Apothecarium’s relocation of its Castro location had broad community support, including from the residents who live in the condos in the new building. At 5,207 square feet it is five times the size of its current location, at 2095 Market Street, allowing more room not only for the staff but also to ensure customers no longer will have to wait outside during peak times.

The plans call for 2,858 square feet accessible to patrons. Architect Vincent Gonzaga worked with local interior design firm Urban Chalet to maintain the Apothecarium’s current neo-Victorian look but with a contemporary twist for the new space.

As the Bay Area Reporter noted in March, an investment group bought the space for an undisclosed amount at the end of 2015. (One online listing had it for sale at a cost of nearly $4.2 million.) It then signed a 10-year lease with the Apothecarium, which includes multiple long-term options to extend it.

The dispensary hopes to open there later this summer.

— Matthew S. Bajko, @ 12:45 pm PST
Filed under: Uncategorized


CA health officials again advise gay, transgender, and HIV positive people to get meningococcal vaccine

meningococcus-meningitis_702685California health officials are again advising gay and bisexual men, as well as transgender people and HIV positive individuals, to get vaccinated against meningococcal disease after another outbreak was reported in Los Angeles.

Meningococcal disease is caused by the bacteria Neisseria meningitidis and can cause meningitis and bloodstream infections (sepsis). Although rare, meningococcal disease is serious and potentially fatal.

Symptoms begin a few days after exposure and may include fever, chills, vomiting, severe headache, stiff neck, confusion, rash, nausea or vomiting, and generalized muscle pains. Anyone who develops these symptoms, especially those with HIV, should immediately seek medical care, warn health officials, by calling 911 or going to the nearest emergency room.

Since the beginning of May, nine meningococcal disease cases have been identified in men living in Los Angeles and Orange Counties, most of whom were gay or bisexual men, according to the California Department of Public Health.

One patient has died as a result of the infection, according to an advisory the CDPH issued this morning (Friday, June 24). Six of the cases are known to be caused by a particular strain (serogroup C) of meningococcal bacteria and one other case is awaiting serogroup confirmation.

“We are concerned that gay and bisexual men in Southern California may be at increased risk for meningococcal disease,” stated CDPH Director and State Public Health Officer Dr. Karen Smith. “We encourage men who partner with other men to be aware of the risk of meningococcal disease and consider getting vaccinated.”

As San Francisco is set to celebrate Pride this weekend, and welcome an influx of visitors from Southern California and other locales, San Francisco’s Department of Public Health issued its own advisory recommending that HIV-positive people, gay men and other men or transgender people who have sex with men get vaccinated.

“Here in San Francisco it is Pride week, with lots of visitors from around the state, the country and the world coming to town to celebrate,” stated Dr. Naveena Bobba, deputy health officer for the City and County of San Francisco. “There will be many parties and festivities. We encourage revelers to consider the meningococcal ACWY vaccine as a way to take charge of their health. The vaccine is widely available and very effective in preventing this disease from spreading.”

According to health officials, gay men and other men or transgender people who have sex with men who have close or intimate contact with multiple partners, or who regularly visit crowded venues such as bars or parties, or who vape or smoke cigarettes, e-cigarettes, marijuana, hookahs or illegal drugs may be at increased risk of meningococcal disease.

Meningococcal bacteria are transmitted from person-to-person through close personal contact involving secretions from the nose and throat. Smoking or being around smokers increases the risk of transmission.

HIV-infected people are particularly at increased risk of contracting meningococcal disease, noted health officials. Because of this increased risk, the U.S. Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommended this week that all HIV-infected persons aged 2 months and older be routinely vaccinated with the meningococcal vaccine that protects against serogroups A, C, W and Y disease (MenACWY).

The advisory about the deadly disease has become a near yearly occurrence since 2012, when a meningitis outbreak infected a dozen men who have sex with men in New York City that year. In December of that year, San Francisco public health officials encouraged gay men planning to travel to New York City to get vaccinated.

In 2013 reports of the death of a gay West Hollywood man who contracted meningitis raised fears about an outbreak on the West Coast. But at the time, San Francisco reported no cases and did not advise gay and bi men traveling to the Los Angeles area to be vaccinated.

That changed in 2014 after Los Angeles County authorities reported eight confirmed cases of invasive meningococcal disease, half of which were in gay and bi men. Los Angeles’s health department recommended vaccination for all local gay and bi men, while San Francisco’s health department advised gay and bi men, as well as transgender women, to get vaccinated if they expected to have close or intimate contact with gay or bi men from Los Angeles.

Last year ahead of Pride weekend, health officials released a warning about a cluster of invasive meningococcal disease cases in Chicago.

In San Francisco vaccination is available to everyone through their primary care providers, at the health department’s Adult Immunization and Travel Clinic and at many pharmacies. San Francisco residents who cannot access those options can get vaccinated at San Francisco City Clinic.

Protection usually begins seven to 10 days after vaccination.  All HIV-infected adults should receive two doses of vaccine, eight to 12 weeks apart. Gay men and other men or transgender people who have sex with men, and who are not HIV-infected, should receive one dose.

— Matthew S. Bajko, @ 11:40 am PST
Filed under: Uncategorized


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