Issue:  Vol. 48 / No. 3 / 18 January 2018
 

Men robbed at gunpoint in Duboce Triangle incidents

Two men were robbed at gunpoint early Thursday morning in separate incidents in the Duboce Triangle area, according to police.

In the first incident, two men who appeared to be in their 20s approached the victim, 37, just after 1 a.m. at 15th and Noe streets. One suspect pointed a handgun at the victim and demanded his property. The victim complied and handed over his backpack, laptop, and cash, said police. At least one of the suspects fled on foot south on Noe toward Market Street.

The second robbery occurred nearby just after 1 a.m. and involved two suspects. In this incident, a man exited a vehicle and approached the victim, 59. He then pointed a handgun at the victim and demanded his property. The victim complied, giving up his wallet and cash. The suspect, who appeared to be between the ages of 25 and 30, got back into the vehicle, which was last seen fleeing east on Duboce toward Church, according to police. A description of the second suspect wasn’t available.

Neither of the victims were injured.

— Seth Hemmelgarn, December 27, 2017 @ 1:42 pm PST
Filed under: Uncategorized


Woman robbed at knifepoint in Castro

Two people robbed a 36-year-old woman at knifepoint early Friday night in San Francisco’s Castro district, according to police.

The incident occurred between 6 and 6:30 p.m. As the victim was walking near Castro and 18th streets, one suspect approached her from behind and pushed her forward. The second suspect approached the victim from behind, pulled out a knife, and demanded her property, said police. The two suspects, who appeared to be 25 to 30 years old, then fled in an unknown direction.

The victim wasn’t injured, but the suspects stole her bag, cash, phone, and jacket, according to police, who didn’t provide the suspects’ genders.

— Seth Hemmelgarn, @ 1:18 pm PST
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SF Supe Farrell decides against 2018 mayoral run

Supervisor Mark Farrell

Supervisor Mark Farrell

Ending speculation that has swirled around him since the death last week of San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee, District 2 Supervisor Mark Farrell has decided against running to lead the city in the June special election.

In an email sent to his supporters this morning (Thursday, December 21), Farrell thanked those who have asked about his running and encouraged him to seek Room 200 at City Hall. But he determined the timing was not right for him to enter the race.

“My top priority is my family,” wrote Farrell, who will be termed out of his board seat in early January of 2019. “My wife, Liz, and our three children, Madison (12), Jack (10), and Kane (5), are everything to me. The timing is simply not right for our family, and I will always put them first.”

Farrell did not disclose what his next step will be, either politically or professionally, once he leaves office. For now, his focus will continue to be representing his constituents in the Marina and Cow Hollow and working on citywide issues.

“I’m not running for mayor, but my work in City Hall is not finished,” he wrote. “My full focus and attention for the remainder of my term will be on addressing the quality of life issues that matter most to San Franciscans: homelessness, housing, and public safety.”

Farrell, part of the moderate majority on the board, is the latest local official to make clear their intentions regarding the June race to serve out the remainder of Lee’s second four-year term, which will end in early January of 2020. Yesterday District 6 Supervisor Jane Kim pulled nominating papers and established a campaign committee to begin raising money for the special mayoral election on the primary ballot.

She joins another progressive in the race, former supervisor Mark Leno, a gay man who went on to serve in the state Legislature until last year. Leno, who for months has been raising money and securing endorsements for the 2019 mayoral election, announced last week he would run next year.

Another former supervisor, attorney Angela Alioto, pulled papers Monday to run for mayor, a position her father Joe Alioto served in from 1968 to 1976. Several lesser-known candidates have also pulled papers for the mayoral race.

Acting Mayor London Breed, who due to being board president automatically took on the duties and responsibilities of mayor, is widely expected to run. Holding the District 5 seat, Breed is part of the board’s six-person moderate bloc.

Other city leaders said to be eyeing a mayoral bid are City Attorney Dennis Herrera, who’s up for re-election in November of 2019, and Assessor-Recorder Carmen Chu, who is up for re-election next November.

Assemblyman David Chiu (D-San Francisco) is also mentioned as a possible candidate. He already had pulled papers to run for re-election to his legislative seat next year, first in the June primary, and it is possible he could also run for mayor on the same ballot.

The filing deadline for candidates to enter the mayoral race is 5 p.m. Tuesday, January 9.

— Matthew S. Bajko, December 21, 2017 @ 12:18 pm PST
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SF Supe Kim joins former Supes Leno, Alioto in 2018 mayor’s race

Supervisor Jane Kim

Supervisor Jane Kim

District 6 Supervisor Jane Kim threw her hat into the 2018 San Francisco mayoral race today (December 20), pulling nominating papers and establishing a campaign committee to begin raising money for the special election on the June primary ballot.

She joins former supervisors Mark Leno, a gay man who went on to serve in the state Legislature, and Angela Alioto, whose father Joe Alioto was a former mayor, in seeking Room 200 at City Hall. Leno, who for months has been raising money and securing endorsements for the 2019 mayoral election, announced last week he would run next year, and Alioto pulled papers Monday.

Due to the sudden death of Mayor Ed Lee Tuesday, December 12, at the age of 65, the mayoral election will now be held in six months, leaving candidates little time to fundraise and campaign. The winner will serve out the remainder of Lee’s term through early January of 2020 and will need to run on the November ballot in 2019 for a full four-year term.

Kim, who will be termed out of office in January of 2019, was widely expected to run for mayor. Despite her losing her bid for the city’s state Senate seat last year to Scott Wiener, a gay man who had been the District 8 supervisor, that campaign allowed Kim to build up her name recognition citywide and meet voters outside of her supervisorial constituents in the Tenderloin and South of Market.

In a media release announcing her decision to jump into the race, Kim said it was time for “fundamental change” in the city.

“Our city and our next mayor will be confronted with the question of what kind of San Francisco we want to be, not just for the next two years but for the next generation,” stated Kim. “Mayor Lee began the process of shepherding us through a period of great transition and it’s important we continue that work and make the needed changes to address income inequality, housing costs, affordable child care and homelessness. These are among the many interconnected challenges that come due to the rising gap between rich and poor – and the hollowing out of our middle class.”

Acting Mayor London Breed, who due to being board president automatically took on the duties and responsibilities of mayor, is widely expected to run. Other city leaders said to be eyeing a mayoral bid include District 2 Supervisor Mark Farrell, like Kim term limited from running again for his Marina-based seat on the board next year; City Attorney Dennis Herrera, who’s up for re-election in November of 2019; and Assessor-Recorder Carmen Chu, who is up for re-election next November.

Assemblyman David Chiu (D-San Francisco) is also mentioned as a possible candidate. He already had pulled papers to run for re-election to his legislative seat next year, first in the June primary, and it is possible he could also run for mayor on the same ballot.

The filing deadline for candidates to enter the mayoral race is 5 p.m. Tuesday, January 9.

 

— Matthew S. Bajko, December 20, 2017 @ 3:51 pm PST
Filed under: Uncategorized


Socialists plan anti-GOP tax cut rally for Harvey Milk Plaza

The San Francisco Democratic Socialists of America and other leftist groups are planning a rally for 5:30 p.m. Friday at Harvey Milk Plaza to protest the Republicans’ tax cut plan, which is nearing final votes in Congress. President Donald Trump is exepcted to sign the bill, which would cut taxes from 35 percent to 21 percent for corporations and lead to an estimated $1.5 trillion increase in the deficit.

Friday’s rally at Castro and Market streets “is meant to send a message to lawmakers: we see what you’re doing, and we’re not going to tolerate it” Shannon Malloy, a member of DSA’s leadership committee, said in a news release. “Republicans might pretend this is tax reform, but a billionaire’s reform is a poor person’s robbery. Let’s call that what it is: class warfare.”

The rally will be accompanied by a day-long email and phone campaign where Democratic lawmakers will be urged to continue fighting “and to support a robust alternative to the Republican agenda — including Medicare-for-all, a livable wage, free education, and a true social safety net,” organizers stated. During the day of activities, Republicans will be told to drop their efforts.

“The economy does best and prosperity is shared most when the country supports workers and gives them the things they need to be productive and thrive: food, housing, health, and safety,” organizers stated.

— Seth Hemmelgarn, December 13, 2017 @ 3:29 pm PST
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Memorial plans for late Mayor Ed Lee set for SF City Hall

Mayor Ed Lee. Photo: Rick Gerharter

Mayor Ed Lee. Photo: Rick Gerharter

San Francisco officials Wednesday announced that memorial events for Mayor Ed Lee, who died suddenly early Tuesday morning of an apparent heart attack, will be held at the City Hall rotunda Friday, December 15 and Sunday, December 17

Lee, who was 65, will lie in state from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday, and at 3 p.m. Sunday, there will be a celebration of his life.

Lee had served as mayor since 2011. Board of Supervisors President London Breed was sworn in as acting mayor immediately after Lee’s death at 1:11 a.m. Tuesday at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital.

Many regarded Lee as a champion of LGBTQ rights, especially for his consistent efforts to push for full HIV/AIDS funding in the city.

For more about Lee and his legacy, see the Thursday, December 14 edition of the Bay Area Reporter.

— Seth Hemmelgarn, @ 3:06 pm PST
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Teens rob man at gunpoint in Castro

Four teenagers robbed a man at gunpoint just before dawn Saturday morning in the Castro district.

Police said the incident started at about 4:30 a.m. when the suspects approached a 48-year-old man in their vehicles at 19th and Church streets. The suspects, who appeared to be 17 or younger, got out and demanded the victim’s property. One of the suspects pointed a gun at the victim while the others stole his cash, laptop, and watch. The suspects then got back in their vehicles and fled north on Church.

No arrests have been reported.

— Seth Hemmelgarn, @ 2:50 pm PST
Filed under: Uncategorized


Chihuahua stolen from women in Castro

A man stole a Chihuahua from two women in the Castro district early Sunday morning, according to police.

The incident occurred at about 5:30 a.m. when the suspect approached the women, who are 46 and 49, as they walked near Castro and Market streets. “A verbal argument ensued,” police said, and the suspect, who’s in his 20s, grabbed the dog from one of the women and fled.

No arrests have been reported.

— Seth Hemmelgarn, @ 2:43 pm PST
Filed under: Uncategorized


SF Mayor Ed Lee dies suddenly

San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee died Tuesday, December 12 at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital. He was 65.

02_11_Mayor_Lee_Int_23_LRG1

According to the San Francisco Chronicle, Lee collapsed at a local Safeway store and was rushed to the hospital. He is believed to have suffered a heart attack.

Lee was a steadfast supporter of the LGBTQ community, appointing out people to various leadership posts in city government, and leading the Mayors Against LGBT Discrimination.

He is survived by his wife, Anita, and two daughters.

The Bay Area Reporter will have more in this week’s paper.

— Cynthia Laird, December 12, 2017 @ 11:12 am PST
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Atkins makes history as new Senate pro tem

by Cynthia Laird

Lesbian state Senator Toni Atkins was selected Thursday (December 7) by her colleagues to be the next president pro tem of the Legislature’s upper house.

The longtime state lawmaker made history being the first woman and first LGBT Senate pro tem in California history.

(State Senator Toni Atkins)

(State Senator Toni Atkins)

Atkins, a San Diego Democrat and former Assembly speaker, will assume the post in January.

“Today, I am incredibly humbled by the trust my colleagues have placed in me, and I intend to earn that trust every day by working tirelessly and inclusively to keep California a place of opportunity for everyone,” Atkins said in a statement posted on her website.

Atkins will take over from state Senator Kevin de Leon (D-Los Angeles), who is running against U.S. Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-California) next year. De Leon will remain in the state Senate.

Atkins has endorsed de Leon in his Senate bid.

De Leon said that the Senate Democratic Caucus is united behind Atkins’ as president pro tem.

“For nearly four years, it’s been a profound honor to lead a unified, progressive and collaborative California State Senate,” de Leon stated. “Together, we’ve put the public interest over individual ambitions and made enduring progress on behalf of millions of Californians.

“Four years ago, our caucus elected the first Latino leader in over a century to lead the California State Senate – and, next year, Senator Atkins will become our first ever woman to be elected Senate leader,” he added.

A formal vote will occur next month.

Colleagues praised Atkins’ selection.

“Toni Atkins is a fantastic leader for our state,” gay state Senator Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco) said in a statement. “She is also a trailblazer for the LGBT community, and I consider her a mentor.”

Wiener said that he has worked with Atkins on a number of initiatives over the years.

“I worked closely with Toni this year on our housing package and on legislation to support transgender and nonbinary people,” Wiener added.

Atkins thanked de Leon for his leadership. “Our collective policy achievements under his leadership have made our state a better place to live, work, raise a family, and attend school, regardless of race, religion, gender, or background,” she stated.

Atkins’ elevation to Senate leadership comes as the Statehouse is rocked by sexual harassment allegations against a number of male lawmakers, one of whom resigned his seat last week, and the Legislature’s current roster of 26 women is the lowest in nearly two decades.

Equality California, the state’s LGBTQ lobbying organization, hailed the selection of Atkins as state Senate leader.

“Senator Toni Atkins is one of the LGBTQ community’s most respected and effective leaders and her upcoming election as the Senate President Pro Tem breaks multiple glass ceilings,” EQCA Executive Director Rick Zbur said in a statement. “Not only will she be the first woman to serve as leader of the California Senate, but Senator Atkins will also be the first LGBTQ person to serve in that role. This follows on her historic career in the Assembly where she became the first lesbian Speaker. Electing role models like Senator Atkins is important to the LGBTQ community because it sends a clear message to our community across the country, particularly LGBTQ youth, that LGBTQ people can achieve anything. By having a seat at the table, LGBTQ elected officials can speak with their colleagues with authenticity and first-hand experience on issues that affect our community.”

Zbur noted some of Atkins’ legislative achievements, such as Senate Bill 179 (Gender Recognition Act of 2017), SB 310 (Name and Dignity Act), AB 1577 (Respect After Death Act), and AB 1211 (Transgender Name Changes, Birth and Death Certificates).

— Cynthia Laird, December 7, 2017 @ 1:04 pm PST
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